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Search Results 0 to 36 of about 37 (some duplicates have been removed)
towns and cities from the southern plains north to illinois. >> and developing overnight, a hot air balloon packed with tourists takes a deadly plunge overseas. >> and snubbed by his own party. chris christie gets the cold shoulder, left off the list for a key republican event. >>> good morning, everyone. welcome to "early start." i'm john berman. i feel like i haven't seen you in days. >> you haven't. good morning to you. good morning to you. thanks for being with us. it's tuesday, february 26th. it is 5:00 a.m. in the east. happening right now, it is a raging blizzard, blasting the southern plains. leaving large parts of texas and oklahoma buried under more than a foot of snow. roads are impassable, drivers are stranded. this picture was sent to us from a reporter philip prince. a trucker stuck on interstate 40 about 50 miles east of amarillo. look at the conditions there. he says the highway has been shut down. he has been stuck for about eight hours when he finally took that picture. two people have been killed, one on an icy road in kansas, another at a home in oklahoma where t
the city's code of conduct when it came to his influence over two projects and matt ackland has more. >> reporter: jim graham is only the sec council member to be punished by his fires. marion barry was punished several years ago and today, barry was the only one supporting graham. it appeared this was the last place that council members wanted to be, called into a meeting to punish one of their own. >> it's not ordinarily constructive to criticize one another, which is why there is a lot of reluctance to do that and why today is an uncomfortable day for the council of the district of columbia. >> reporter: uncomfortable but necessary. it was chairman mendelson who came up with the punishment after seeing the results of three independent investigations suggested that graham broke the city's code of conduct when he agreed to trade boats on two projects. >> it might be appropriate for a council member to publicly express a preference, it's not appropriate for a council member to attempt to influence behind-the-scenes who may win a bid. >> the public has to trust us to do what is right
kansas city affiliate kctc, is in overland park, kansas. good morning. >> reporter: many people are already digging out of last week's snowstorm where a foot and a half of snow fell. and they are expecting much more today. they could see another foot here in kansas. the latest winter storm is unleashing blizzard conditions from texas to oklahoma and kansas. a system so powerful you can literally hear its fury. this was amarillo texas, monday where howling winds whipped around more than a foot and a half of snow creating five-foot snow drift in some areas. >> we're going to step outside and let you see what it's like so far. ooh. >> reporter: the storm knocked out power to thousands in texas and oklahoma and brought traffic to a standstill closing miles of interstates and highways across the southwest. on some road, strong winds and driving snow reduced visibility to near zero. emergency crews focused on locating and rescuing stranded drivers while in some spots motorists abandoned their cars altogether. by monday afternoon, the system had moved into kansas
's aging infrastructure? >> there fact is that -- baltimore is no different than any other city in the mid atlantic or the next. we have a lot of infrastructure that is aging. we can see it with bridges and tunnels and water and sewer systems. we're no different. we need to continue to invest and reinvest in the system. to keep up and modernize the system. that takes investment. >> reporter: bge says with the new increase customer's bills will typically be lower than 2009, because the cost of energy has dropped. >>> massive automatic spending cuts will take effect in less than a week. democrats are saying if the cuts go through on the 1st of march, everyone, from food inspectors to fbi agents will lose their jobs. but republicans are accusing the white house of using scare tactics the raise taxes. >>> among the many areas impacted if those cuts take effect maryland's airports. we could see widespread delays at bwi and smaller airports could shutdown. kai jackson with more on the looming travel crisis. >> reporter: a budget battle in washin
a battle tonight during the city council this evening. according to the chronicle, the residents approved of the plan to build the new homes but they don't like the plans to bring down the magnolia trees and the chilean trees. earlier this year, the planning commission approved that plan but it's gone back and forth and gone back to appeal twice now and they are planning ong having that meeting later on this evening. there are 25 residents here banning together who say they want the trees to stay here. that's where we stand. pretty big lot. the planning commission meeting expected to begin tonight at about 7:00. we are live here in menlo park. brian flores, ktvu channel 2 news. >> thank you, brian. >>> 7:05. breaking news. "the associated press" is reporting that president obama will announce in his state of the union address tonight that 34,000 u.s. troops will be home from afghanistan a year from today. right now, there are 60,000 u.s. troops in afghanistan. all combat troops are supposed to leave afghanistan by the end of 2014. that's when the u.s.-led international forces are schedule
in the past. grow up. host: jim is in bay city, michigan. republican. good morning. caller: good morning. i want to talk about this gas prices at four dollars per gallon. we have a president that all he talks about is solar and wind mills and stuff like that. it is ridiculous. we have oil up to our ears hear in this country, and environmentalists are the only thing stopping refineries and anything that makes it all. i wish they would go back to their caves where they belong. host: from "wall street journal," "florida governor supports broader medicaid," saying he wants the state to expand medicaid under the federal health law, taking him the seventh gop governor to back expansion of medicaid, along with michigan governor rick snyder and ohio governor john kasich. mr. scott said that he supports a three-year expansion as long as the federal government agrees to keep its commitment to pay 100% of the cost during this time. he called a compassionate, commonsense step forward. president obama's original 2010 health law called for the us to pay 100% of the cost for three years." that is in "wall
. kansas city, digging out once again. and the heavy, wet snow, bringing down old trees. and creating a new danger, roof collapses. one man was killed after a roof buckled in oklahoma. in belton, missouri, a family narrowly made it out, after this wall came crashing down. >> it was like a big, huge salad bowl. that's when i realized, we have to get out. >> reporter: two hours west, in missouri's capital, jefferson city, the entire ceiling and front wall of this warehouse, destroyed. so, here at o'hare, and at many airports, it will be a day of playing catchup. and another busy day of digging out across the path of this storm. sam? >> alex, the middle of the country taking a wallop out of this storm system. as it continues to move east, there's still some snow left. we'll see maine, northern new york state, coming in with an additional six inches of snow there. we'll go through all of america's weather when we come back in a minute. elizabeth? >> sam, thank you so much. >>> and we're going to turn, now, to washington. and the grim countdown to the massive spending cuts that will kick in on f
. the first thing i ever did politically was in 1993, lead a tax revolt, pensacola city hall tried to raise taxes by 65%. and they tried -- if we don't raise taxes 65%, this was right after the clinton tax increases and the state. and i was saying this is going to be devastating for our economic development. well, the city -- every city councilman got up there and councilwoman saying we don't get 65% tax increase, the firefighters aren't going to be able to come and rescue your little doggy from the tree. when your children are going to walk down streets that aren't going to be -- and they went on and on, tumbleweeds are going to be rolling -- guess what? we killed the tax increase. you know what happened? they gave their 11 city managers a 35% pay raise the next week. how many times -- why do i bring that up? it ain't just pensacola. every time americans hear politicians on any level saying, you know, we've got to spend more money, or else the world comes to an end. they just don't believe it anymore. >> i have a list of the national horrors that are going to occur when sequestration takes
, that is a big one at the subway station in new york city. two months later she saw the subway station attendant who was working that day. she asked him, did anyone find my ring a couple of months ago? lo and behold it had been sitting there in an envelope next to the cash register. the woman who found it did not speak english, she gave it to her in a little bag. she said she new it was an engagement ring and never would have kept it. she was waiting for her to come back. bill: there is a new study martha that says woman actually talk more than men. 13,000 more words every single day. researchers found that women's brain have higher levels of language protein. another reason girls also learn to speak earlier and more quickly than boys. martha: that is no big surprise. they are basically smarter. i don't think they counted the word on this particular show. we are going to do a word count, see who talks more, me or bill. [laughter] martha: for once he has nothing to say. bill: they needed a study for that? martha: we are going to count the words. bill: have a great day, everybody. martha: bye ever
here. >> reporter: at kansas city international airport, crews worked to deice planes though many flights were canceled as the blizzard continued battering the state overnight. >> we're very concerned about this storm, believe it may be worse than the last one, and portions of our state it will be worse than the last one. >> reporter: because the snow is expected to fall throughout the day, officials are urging people to stay home stay indoors and not get on the roads. even if someone decided to try to get out, most places are closed, including schools, government offices, and businesses. >> all right now let's check in with meteorologist jeff grar deli of cbs station wfor. where is the storm headed next? >> one part of the storm is moving into the great lakes and the national weather service issued a tornado watch for central and northern parts of florida, that means isolated tornadoes are possible and wind gusts up to 80 miles an hour. if you're in and around the tampa area orlando through jacksonville, watch out some pretty big storms are headed your way
england. bring the umbrella with you this morning in new york city, philadelphia, down to the d.c., baltimore areas. starting off your morning commute dry. we've got rain and snow heading our way late today. currently that storm is located over tennessee bringing some rain and snow mixture right along the ohio river. even louisville could pick up a half inch of snow. there's the forecast for today. it's actually going to be mild during the day. but then it will get cloudy. the rain will come. it will get a little colder, changing over to snow in philadelphia and new york especially after dark. most of us will get home okay. the roads won't be slippery. later on tonight they will get slippery. just enough to be on the annoying side. about one to three inches predicted for new york city to philadelphia. there's a little sliver central jersey towards the coast and long island that could pick up three to four. boston and hartford not looking at much for you at all. the rest of the country today, we're leaving the southeast with a little bit of chance for rain today. especially north
in and around the kansas city area. lighter blue, six to 12 easily. that could include the chicago area. they have not seen a lot of snow this season if you can believe it. winter weather advisories for all the areas in pink. those are winter storm warnings. we have ice storm warning where we could see significant icing. very dangerous. people are urged to stay off the roads where we're getting ice. there is kansas city, miss sourcery, that bull's eye where we could get 12 to 18 inches of snow. some places we're getting a snowstorm they haven't seen in last couple years. the snow plows are out, people are shovel-ready. the snow side of the storm we'll see hail, damaging wind and even tornados in the area you see in yellow. luckily no warnings yet but we'll keep you posted. we'll watch the icy mix up through missouri, illinois, into ohio into friday. we'll still be talking about this storm. john and jenna, if i could, the moisture associated with the cold front, part of that could develop into a nor'easter that could bring some heavy snow totals to new england, areas that saw one, two, t
. this is a ton going on right now in politics. but in this city you might never know it. because the thing that is happening here that is dominating everything else, that is all but eclipsing all those other significant things going on in the country which might need some attention, hey, alaska is kind of succeeding, the thing that d.c. is spending all its time on and that the entire federal government has been wrenched around into dealing with is none of the real crises or real fights or real opportunities for progress in american politics right now. with all of that going on what washington is smothered by right now is this, the freakin' sequester which congress and the white house agreed to which they almost unanimously agree would be a terrible thing to inflict on the country, and which they could just decide not to do simply by repealing it. but apparently they're not going to repeal it. the white house taking every opportunity now to spell out the harm that this thing is going to do to the country. they have put out fact sheets on the hundreds of thousands of jobs expected to be lost
are more prepared during rush hours. >> reporter: in the district the city budgeted $6 million for winter weather and spent about $2 million of that. the area that's been hardest hit, maryland. state highway administration budgeted $41 million statewide to battle snow and already spent about $35 million of that. highway administration says a combination of weather and the western part of the state and repeated deployments here at home have gobbled up the budget. but sha maintains it has muff resources to get lou the rest of the winter. drivers looking at the blue sky today wonder if anything substantial will come this year. >> i like one sngood snow a yea. >> reporter: we haven't got it yet. >> no, not yet. >> reporter: back here live in merrifield. weather for the ride home mitt is pretty much perfect. coming up at 6:00, if local road crews have money leftover from the snow budgets, what they will do with it. adam tuss, news4. >> you need a plumber? maybe a mechanic? you don't know who to trust. so you go to angie's list. yelp or another customer review site. >> can you trust the first t
, and the city was in tough shape as a lot of cities are today. what did you do when you got in there? was one of your first things not that you didn't tell people the truth about the existing condition? >> the very first thing i did it, and i did it for a solid year, in fact, six months going back into the campaign is tell people just how bad the situation was, that we had to cut everything, that if we did it right over the course of time, we could replenish those cuts and grow and grow and grow. and fortunately that's exactly what happened. but the first thing you've got to do is convince your supporters to get on board. and i think he could do it. he's popular now. >> so are you saying he should be talking about cuts and different things that he's offered to the republicans to his base? >> first he should talk to harry and nancy. he should bring them in and say, you were there -- >> come on, guys. >> you were with me on health care. you've got to lead on this. >> pelosi certainly didn't sound like she agreed with really being realistic. >> he's got to get the two of them on board first. >>
sisters and for 16 dwhreerns columbus city council. most recently he served local republicans as county and district chair. he was my dear friend. i got to know ted when i ran for office, he said he was happy to see me but his boys had a swim meet and i'd have to go there. i went and probably learned more about swimming than politics. in his quiet but direct way, he shed -- showed me where it he set his priorities and when it came time for me to have a wife and children where i should set mine. ity try to do that. mr. rokita: i will miss his friendsship, counsel and good example. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentleman from texas seek recognition? >> i ask unanimous consent to address the house for one minute and revise and extend my remarks. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, the gentleman is recognized for one minute. mr. olson: mr. speaker, on april 12, 1981, the space shuttle columbia blasted off ointo space station to launch america's space shuttle program. she would complete 28 missions with over 300 days in space. as every american know
leavy in oklahoma city and public service as a u.s. magistrate in the western district of oklahoma. as evidence of his career and distinction, when judge bacharach was chosen to be a magistrate judge from a pool of many well-qualified candidates, the chief judge characterized the decision as an easy one. since that time, his colleagues have characterized his service as remarkable, demonstrating superb judicial temperament and a real asset to the western district family and the legal community. as with any position in the judicial branch that comes with a lifetime appointment, the senate must deliberate carefully, and we did and gave all the thought to this nominee, and as was shown and clearly demonstrated by a unanimous vote of confirmation. you don't see this very often but you saw it with judge bacharach. so i appreciate the opportunity to support him today and to have been able to call and be the first to congratulate him in this new part of his career, which we will be very, very proud and i can assure the chair and all the rest of them that this is a guy that we will always b
it's indiscriminate killing, and in the old days you'd throw a rock over the walls of the city, and you didn't see who you killed. if the prophet muhammad used catapults, that means if he lived today, he would use nuclear weapons. people tend to say, oh, that's just religion, people are rational. which isn't quite true. religious fault lines in the middle east are critical. i think once iran goes nuclear, i think we're going to have a severe shia/sunni fortnight, threatening the sunni dominance in the world -- in the middle east. we will probably see very close to that a pakistani, a nuclear presence, a pakistani-extended deterrence in saudi arabia. the saudis finance the pakistani nuclear program. they have a prior agreement with them that if saudi arabia calls for it, they will provide them with nuclear weapons. i doubt that the pakistanis will just deliver a bomb. they would probably station elements in the region, and this would, is going to raise a question regarding for the first time a pakistani second-strike capability against india which would certainly complicate the
to expand the voucher program. in the city of milwaukee, they have involved in the voucher program 112 private schools. almost 35,000 students. the total costs overall is 150 $4000. 30 eight percent comes from public school funds. another 62% of general revenue in the state. -- 38% comes from public school funds. another 62% comes from general revenue in the state shou. guest: acer does a model for a lot of voucher -- it served as a model for a lot of voucher programs around the country. states found that students performed at about the same level as traditional public schools in milwaukee. in a recent study out of the university of arkansas shows positive results for students with vouchers. i believe the program has been shown pretty strong results in terms of graduation rates. the milwaukee voucher is held up as a model. the opinions of it will break down pretty much along the lines of voucher programs all over. governor walker believes that parents are buying into the program and it is proving popular. it might prove popular in other school districts around wisconsin. host: we are t
bureaucracy can afford to bear the brunt of these cuts, not our military, not communities like lake city or mayo or newberry or middleberg, florida. i'm working with my friend from georgia, congressman doug collins, on the new freshmen regulatory reform working group, to help show exactly where some of these cuts are and help businesses do what they do best, they grow the economy and they create jobs, bringing in more revenues to our government. we need and we will show the president and the american people that we can cut wasteful spending without hurting kids, our seniors and that we can make responsible cuts that do not put our national security at risk. and not add to the heavy tax burden of hardworking americans that they're already carrying. it was a shame that the president and the senate have avoided working with the house in real budgeting process. i look forward to working with all my colleagues on resupporting -- restoring faith to the american people and bringing order back to this process. thank you, mr. speaker, and i yield back the balance of my time. mr. westmoreland: i t
, and we must thank the city of savannah department of cultural affairs, festival upon spores, members, and individual donors for their support. it is because of them that we are able to bring you these esteemed authors for free. if you enjoyed today's speakers and would like to make a donation to the festival, we've provided yellow buckets at the door when you exit. please consider giving to our bucket list for next year's gifted scribes. before we get started, i just have a couple of housekeeping notes for you. please take a moment to silence your cell phones. i had to do that myself. okay. immediately following his presentation, mr. gore will be signing copies of his book. please go to the fellowship hall which is located directly behind the pulpit, and you go out the doors and around, and a right turn as you enter the exit the sanctuary. there's volunteers outside to direct you. mr. gore will be able to sign 400 books, and you must have the numbered card that was included with your book purchase. your signing order will correspond with your card number, and you will be called in gr
's office, attorney general eric holder, to just in my city alone, the city of houston, to report 15 voter abuse cases. without the preclearance where would we be? or the proposal to eliminate the independent school district board of trustees, over a school district that has worked hard to survive, will be subjected to the preclearance to determine whether not only the students will be denied their right to learn in a school district they love and is fighting for their education, but that elected persons will be denied the right to serve and others denied the right to vote for them. the voting rights act protects all voters. it gives them all the right to vote, one vote one person. shelby county has raised the issue they should not be subjected to preclearance. they are beyond that. the district court, federal court decided in washington, d.c., that they were wrong. that preclearance is constitutional. and we know that well because about -- because when we had the privilege of re-authorizing section 5 in 2006, building on the leadership of my predecessor, the honorable barbara jordan, who
and producing in ge-sun city work -- ge- sensitive markets. we will look at monitoring, maintaining the. t of publicly held germ classes, because there is concern about that. -- the purity of publicly-held germ classes, because there is concern about that. as will mitigate the risk associated when folks want to do things a little bit differently, in the same general space. it is part of managing risk. the long-term risk we will face, with a changing climate -- i will conclude with this. there is no question that the climate is changing. we recently furnished to assessments from usda on the impact of changing climates on agriculture and forestry. the conclusions were pretty obvious. higher temperatures lead to more intense weather patterns. more intense weather patterns lead to greater stress for crops and livestock. and increase tree mortality. we at usda have a responsibility to figure out ways in which we can mitigate the risks of something we really cannot control. when it happens, we cannot control when a drought occurs. we cannot control when a horrible tornado hits, or when flooding
. as optometrist opening a new practice in a struggling mill city he was strung by how few of his young patients had plans to go to college. mr. kennedy: when he asked why, the response was a simple answer, my pearnts condition afford it. a at the time the average cost of tuition was a couple hundred dollars a year. dr. franken did the math he figured if each of the 30,000 town's household gave $1 they could send every single senior in the city to college. is dollars for scholars was born. he began collecting as little as $1 from neighbors to provide scholarships. four decades later, what began as a card table operation became scholarship america which has awarded $3 billion in scholarships across 38 states. at 92 years old, dr. franken continues to fight for the city he loves and the students he made his life work. i recognize him and his wife charlotte -- i congratulate him and his wife charlotte on recognition they deserve. the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentleman rise? >> address the house for one minute and revise and extend my remarks. the speaker pro tempore: without o
resigned from her seat on the chicago city council. >> it would be hard for any family to go through what we've gone through publicly. >> reporter: the former congressman has been out of the public eye for the last eight months while being treated at mate crow clinic for a bipolar disorder. in washington, susan mcginnis, cbs news. >> of course right here on wusa9, we'll be covering the hearings. we'll have more for you online on wusa9.com and of course at noon. >>> it is 6:38. jessica is back with another your money report. >> at this rate furloughs they say are coming for government workers. >> that's right. congress is on recess. there only seems to be finger pointing going on when it comes to sequestration. there are now only 9 days left to stop the automatic across- the-board spending cuts. that's why the pentagon is expected to announce a plan to furlough nearly 800,000 civilian employees one day each week beginning in april. that's essentially a 20% pay cut. federal law requires the pentagon to warn congress of furloughs at least 45 days in advance. exceptions here will include poli
latin-american drug gangs have invaded every city of significant size in the united states. phoenix is one of the kidnapping capitals of the world. states on the u.s./mexico border may be the first places to suffer from cartel violence. by no means are they the last. all of the latin-american drug gangs to fight on through on your way to work, he says guns would help that. >> bill: this is why you need an ar-15 in every house in columbus ohio. >> after hurricane sandy we saw the hellish world that the gun prohibitions see. looters ran wild. there was no food, water or electricity. if you wanted to walk several miles to get supplies, you better get back before dark or you might not get home at all. it is the most paranoid thing i have ever read. it is crazy! >> bill: he is certifiably insane. >> we'll tweet out a link. >> bill: i can't believe the nra doesn't recognize that. every time they put him out in front, they lose ground. >> he's not helping. >> bill: alex, that gets back to the issue of ticking through some of the things -- the main ideas in the president's state of the unio
, it's not like you're a city or you're a county, or your state government or your household or your business. we budget off of projections in growth. so the task a year or so ago was for a group of six republicans and six democrats to come up with $1.2 trillion. it's beyond belief that that did not occur. so sequester was put in place as a mechanism to ensure that there at least was some slowing of growth. the first seven months of the sequester is the most ham-handed portion of it and it's cut at the p.p.a. level, it's across the board, and focused on two important categories. i agree that it's ham-handed and the only thing worse than sequestration in my opinion would be kicking the can down the road on some much-needed fiscal discipline here in washington. so i hope that would we'll do today is get behind a very thoughtful proposal that would say look, we're still going to reduce spending by this amount, but we're going to give the executive branch, because this first seven months is handled so differently than what happens after that --, after that, by the way, appropriators live
. if somebody applied in the, to the mexico city u.s. embassy in january of 2007, and someone else crossed the border and is here in january of 2008, we all agree that the person who waited in line in 2007 should be able to get that green card before the person in 2008. we have to figure out how to do that so it's not an interminalably long period of time, that people are old or dead before they become. at the same time we have to make sure that this principle is kept because that helps us pass a bill. one other point i would make. we made two exceptions to that. dick durbin worked very hard on the dream act. we all agreed that should get special priority. >> young people born here as children? >> yeah. second we'll need something special for agriculture because it is a different situation. virtually whether you're in new york dairy country or arizona ranching country you can't get americans to do this kind of work. >> we're about to get the hook. my penultimate question, senator mccain, have you talked to speaker boehner about this? >> no but i did hear this statement a couple days ago wh
, the city to hold 10% your entire working life for your retirement. between jobs and layoffs -- and i have always been fortunate to make as much as college graduates, but between the jobs and layoffs throughout my work life and the clinton era taxes and everything -- i'm not blaming him, i thought he was a good president even though i am a republican, i just want someone's opinion on people my age and why we have so little put away. we are the generation of all the crises and the tail end of that . host: before we get a response from paul taylor, are you still with us? caller: >> i am. host: what has your savings patterns been over the last couple years? caller: i had to quit contributing to my 401k's just to get by with the rising cost of living from 2006 to present i went four years without a pay increase from my employers because they were in a financial struggle as well with the economic hit in 2007 and slow growth to 2009. we finally got a pay increase last year because of somewhat of a comeback in our industry. host: thank you. that age group is critical when it comes to your 401k pl
of raising 50 million sub-saharan africans out of poverty over the next decade alone. city kids are going back to work. their grand parents ranches, farmers are having their own -- their own online dating service. and the most talked about super bowl commercial, courtesy of the late paul harvey, was dodge rams heartwarming tribute to the american farmer. him what's that kenny chesney song? she thinks my tractor's sexy? you know, there's some truth to that. agricultural issues are, i would argue, sexy. if not sexy, increasingly critical and increasingly important. so i'm glad to be here and it's metaphorically appropriate that we are here today, because it turns out it was february 21, 1865, 148 years
's from huffington post. to bonnie, let's go to our republican line next, to nicholas in new york city. nicholas, welcome. >> caller: well, it's great to be here, and thank you, and i'll try to make it brief, and let me apologize to the others waiting on line. i just, very quickly, you know, i came here as a child in 1966, and they moved us up to the bronx. we came here through red cross auspices. and, you know, my dad and mom worked two and three jobs, eventually they bought real estate because they saved their money. we were subsistence farmers back home -- >> host: nicholas, where -- where was back home? you said you came here in '66. where was back home? >> caller: montenegro today on border of albanian on the coast of adriatic sea. we were albanian catholics. in fact, we were a minority amongst other minorities, but we were the minority. >> host: back to our question, how do you think these budget cuts will affect you? >> guest: well, i've been watching this thing, and it seems like i've seen this movie before. now, i've worked very hard as my mom and daddied, as my brothers do, a
Search Results 0 to 36 of about 37 (some duplicates have been removed)